Tips for skin infections

Crystaderm® cream effectively prevents skin infection forming in cuts and grazes.

Preventing skin infection in cuts and grazes

Apply pressure to the cut with a clean cloth, tissue or piece of gauze until the bleeding stops. Once the wound is clean and dry, apply a thin layer of Crystaderm and cover with a dressing if desired.

For serious cuts

If the cut is very deep and is bleeding excessively, you may need to have it treated by a medical professional. Until this can be arranged, keep pressure applied to the wound and if blood soaks through the material, don’t remove it. If the cut is on an arm or leg, raise it above the heart to help stop the bleeding.

Treating grazes

Wash the graze as soon as possible and stop any bleeding. Once the wound is clean and dry, apply a thin layer of Crystaderm and cover with a dressing if desired.

Ongoing treatment for cuts and grazes

Crystaderm can be applied up to three times per day. A covered injury may only need Crystaderm Cream applied once per day. Uncovered wounds may require reapplication two or three times per day.

Treatment can be continued for up to 21 days. After this time the wound should be significantly healed.

If pain, inflammation, discharge, or red lines continue to be experienced, the wound could be infected and you should seek medical advice.

Why use Crystaderm?

Many infection-fighting creams can excessively dry the skin, causing flaking, peeling and further irritation.

Crystaderm is well tolerated with very few side effects, and not known to dry surrounding skin. Making Crystaderm an ideal first aid cream for fighting skin infections.

www.aftpharm.com

AFT Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd, Sydney

Crystaderm® First Aid Cream (Hydrogen Peroxide cream 1% w/w, 15g and 25g) is a first aid antiseptic to help treat and prevent infection in minor cuts, wounds and abrasions. Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist or you have side effects see your healthcare professional.

References:
1. Christensen OB, Anehus S. Hydrogen peroxide cream: an alternative to topical antibiotics in the treatment of impetigo contagiosa. Acta Derm Venereol. 1994 Nov;74(6):460–2.
2. Lipsky, B. A., and Hoey, C., Topical Antimicrobial Therapy for Treating Chronic Wounds, 2009, 49:1541–1549.

Tips for skin infections

Crystaderm® cream effectively prevents skin infection forming in cuts and grazes.

Preventing skin infection in cuts and grazes

Apply pressure to the cut with a clean cloth, tissue or piece of gauze until the bleeding stops. Once the wound is clean and dry, apply a thin layer of Crystaderm and cover with a dressing if desired.

For serious cuts

If the cut is very deep and is bleeding excessively, you may need to have it treated by a medical professional. Until this can be arranged, keep pressure applied to the wound and if blood soaks through the material, don’t remove it. If the cut is on an arm or leg, raise it above the heart to help stop the bleeding.

Treating grazes

Wash the graze as soon as possible and stop any bleeding. Once the wound is clean and dry, apply a thin layer of Crystaderm and cover with a dressing if desired.

Ongoing treatment for cuts and grazes

Crystaderm can be applied up to three times per day. A covered injury may only need Crystaderm Cream applied once per day. Uncovered wounds may require reapplication two or three times per day.

Treatment can be continued for up to 21 days. After this time the wound should be significantly healed.

If pain, inflammation, discharge, or red lines continue to be experienced, the wound could be infected and you should seek medical advice.

Why use Crystaderm?

Many infection-fighting creams can excessively dry the skin, causing flaking, peeling and further irritation.

Crystaderm is well tolerated with very few side effects, and not known to dry surrounding skin. Making Crystaderm an ideal first aid cream for fighting skin infections.

 

 

 

Read more          Purchase now

 

 

 

Crystaderm® cream effectively prevents skin infection forming in cuts and grazes.

Preventing skin infection in cuts and grazes

Apply pressure to the cut with a clean cloth, tissue or piece of gauze until the bleeding stops. Once the wound is clean and dry, apply a thin layer of Crystaderm and cover with a dressing if desired.

For serious cuts

If the cut is very deep and is bleeding excessively, you may need to have it treated by a medical professional. Until this can be arranged, keep pressure applied to the wound and if blood soaks through the material, don’t remove it. If the cut is on an arm or leg, raise it above the heart to help stop the bleeding.

Treating grazes

Wash the graze as soon as possible and stop any bleeding. Once the wound is clean and dry, apply a thin layer of Crystaderm and cover with a dressing if desired.

Ongoing treatment for cuts and grazes

Crystaderm can be applied up to three times per day. A covered injury may only need Crystaderm Cream applied once per day. Uncovered wounds may require reapplication two or three times per day.

Treatment can be continued for up to 21 days. After this time the wound should be significantly healed.

If pain, inflammation, discharge, or red lines continue to be experienced, the wound could be infected and you should seek medical advice.

Why use Crystaderm?

Many infection-fighting creams can excessively dry the skin, causing flaking, peeling and further irritation.

Crystaderm is well tolerated with very few side effects, and not known to dry surrounding skin. Making Crystaderm an ideal first aid cream for fighting skin infections.

 

 

 

Read more

Purchase now

 

 

 

www.aftpharm.com

AFT Pharmaceuticals Pty Ltd, Sydney

Crystaderm® First Aid Cream (Hydrogen Peroxide cream 1% w/w, 15g and 25g) is a first aid antiseptic to help treat and prevent infection in minor cuts, wounds and abrasions. Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist or you have side effects see your healthcare professional.

References:
1. Christensen OB, Anehus S. Hydrogen peroxide cream: an alternative to topical antibiotics in the treatment of impetigo contagiosa. Acta Derm Venereol. 1994 Nov;74(6):460–2.
2. Lipsky, B. A., and Hoey, C., Topical Antimicrobial Therapy for Treating Chronic Wounds, 2009, 49:1541–1549.